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Gateway’s love and support in this pivotal time in history for the black community and our nation - A letter from lead pastor John Burke

God convicted me many years ago that racism is pure evil, and it must be opposed. We stand against racism, and we are committed to learn, grow, and repent of our own blind spots and biases because justice is rooted not in politics, but in the heart of God.

As we learn our way toward God’s heart for justice and healing, we know we have more work to engage in our hearts and in our church, and we want to invite you on this important journey.

“Learn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed” (Isaiah 1:17).
“For the Lord is a God of justice. Blessed are all who wait for him!” (Isaiah 30:18).

In this critical moment, let’s all seek God’s path of justice which Dr. King and others demonstrated, fighting evil, not with evil, but with love. And I want to encourage all who call Gateway “home” to seek to listen with a humble heart to those who are oppressed. Racism is real, injustice is real, and we can be a healing community that walks toward solutions rooted in God’s Kingdom as we humbly listen to one another. Let’s unite as brothers and sisters with one God and Father, remembering that He sees our diversity as the many members of His body, where “all the members care for each other. If one part suffers, all the parts suffer with it, and if one part is honored, all the parts are glad.” 1 Corinthians 12:25-26

We are working with a diverse group of churches and pastors to grow in this as a church family as well as to engage with city leaders and our police chief to see real, lasting change in line with God’s Kingdom in our city. We want to share this resource page to give each of us practical ways to make progress. Let’s join together and work for the justice, reconciliation, peace, healing, and unity only God can bring as we seek His will together.

With much love,

Prayers for unity, justice, and peace

Watch a Recent Gateway Church Online Prayer Event
Gateway Church staff and leaders prayed for our nation, for those who face injustice, for our leaders, for those charged with protecting us, and for the Church to be united and live out our God’s call to faith, hope, and love.


Help Us Lord – a prayer by a Gateway prayer leader

Read the prayer.

Standing with the Black Community Prayer Event

Several of our pastors and prayer team leaders gathering together online for prayers focusing on repentance, reconciliation, God’s restorative justice, and healing. We heard from some of our African American leaders on ways to pray. We spent time in adoration, confession, thanksgiving, listening, and in intercession. Originally aired June 18th.

Help Us Seek Racial Reconciliation

At Gateway, we are on a journey of learning and growing in our relationship with Jesus, even as we face difficult times. Often, we need extra grace as we stumble along. One thing we see throughout Scripture is that, during these times, God’s people are often asked to live their lives working through the tension between grief and hope. We are living in such a time. We grieve the grave racial disparities and loss of life, and yet we cry out in prayer and defiant hope that God would respond and that He would use us to be part of his work of healing and justice. We cry out our prayers, and prayer moves us to action.

As we at Gateway have prayed, we have been moved to connect our community with the following resources. Again, we recognize that this is only the beginning and there is more work to be done. But our prayer is that these resources would stretch you and grow you alongside us. 

Additionally, staff, and leaders at Gateway have compiled a few action steps that you can start doing now: 

  1. Be kind to your neighbors and co-workers of all backgrounds. Assume the best in people. And particularly, notice when you’re not doing this. Work to retrain yourself. 
  2. Grow in your awareness: Read books, explore podcasts, and listen to our series You Belong Here 
  3. Examine your circle of friends and expand it to include others who are different from you. Learn from others who are willing to share their experiences.
  4. Courageously support/advocate for others who are treated unjustly. Connect with local organizations and your local representatives. Speak up when those connected to you say something racially inappropriate. When racially traumatizing events happen, check in on your brown and black friends. Serve alongside communities disproportionately impacted by systemic injustice.

Thank you for journeying with us as we pursue God’s healing and justice in our world. Join us as we seek to be a community of both prayer and action.

Other Resources

White Identity: A Journey Toward Peacemaking

The conversation about race may feel new, scary, even overwhelming, but now is the time for us listen, learn, and grow into God’s heart for all people. We are creating an intentional space for our white brothers and sisters to process and grow together toward God’s heart for restorative justice.

 

This is an exciting opportunity to learn how you can bring healing to our broken world.

Roadmap to Reconciliation

Starting June 28th
1:30 p.m.

 

Join us online on Sundays at 1:30 p.m., for a discussion with Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil about her book, Roadmap to Reconciliation 2.0. We will discuss how to pursue God’s heart for reconciliation and justice as we grow in cultural awareness, community partnerships, and advocacy.

Reconciliation and Justice Network

A network pursuing God’s heart for reconciliation and justice as we grow together in cultural awareness, community partnerships, and advocacy. Express interest and find out more information by filling out a quick form for the networks at our South or Pflugerville locations.

Not Like Me

Eric Bryant, our South location pastor, authored Not Like Me. Eric shares how we can become agents of change by striving for unity with others of various backgrounds and belief systems through community building and relationships. Send Eric an email to request your free copy!

Beyond Colorblind

In the midst of increasing racial tensions and injustice, we yearn for a better world but we can’t heal what we can’t see. We need something beyond colorblindness. This 6-week class is a safe space for you to grow with others and discover how your story can be transformed to bring healing to our fractured world. Our current class is full, however, we have a consistent rotation of this class offered throughout the year. Stay tuned.

Be the Bridge

Founded by Latasha Morrison, a former Gateway staff member, Be the Bridge is an organization that empowers people and culture toward racial healing, equity, and reconciliation. Latasha is a certified trainer in cultural intelligence and unconscious bias. She has been recognized globally for being a cultural bridge-builder.